Bayshore Waterfront Park

Facebook Logo719 Port Monmouth Road, Port Monmouth, NJ 07758 
732-787-3033 - Activity Center  
732-495-2115 - Ranger Station    
Park Brochure & Map  | Tick Advisory  
Upcoming Drop-In Offerings 
 
Park opens at 7 a.m. daily, year round.     
Closing time is 6:30 p.m. March 13; 8 p.m. March 14-April 4; and 8:30 p.m. April 5-May 2.   

Face coverings are required in all park buildings and outdoors when social distancing
cannot be reasonably maintained. Some buildings are closed to the general public when programs are in session. 
(updated 9/8/2020)
  
 
 
Bayshore Waterfront Park, located in Port Monmouth next to Monmouth Cove Marina, preserves a thriving coastal landscape on Sandy Hook Bay.  Enjoy the maritime shrublands, tidal creeks, salt marshes, dunes, mile of beach and scenic views across the water.  The park offers a fishing pier, access to Raritan Bay, and beautiful views of the NY skyline.  The Park System continues to add to this site's 229 acres in the Bayshore area.


seabrook-wilson house
Bayshore Waterfront Park Activity Center
 
This park is also home of the Bayshore Waterfront Park Activity Center (Seabrook-Wilson House), one of the oldest surviving houses in the region. This large frame building, dating back to the early 1700's, was constructed in several phases over the course of two hundred years. The Park System acquired the building from Middletown Township in 1998. The building has been fully restored and now hosts Park System nature and history programs. Most programs require pre-registration. Visit our programs and registration page to see upcoming offerings.  
 
fishing pier
Fishing pier
 
Fishing 
Please be aware NJ anglers age 16 and up are now required to register with the NJ Saltwater Angler Registry (for free) to fish in marine and fresh tidal waters of NJ. For more information regarding the registration, click here. 
 
tours
House Tours

Here are our upcoming offerings:

Seashell Sunday   
Sunday, February 28 from 1-2 p.m.     
Sunday, May 16 from 1-2 p.m.   
Starting a shell collection this year? It’s the best way to get to know the Jersey Shore.  Want to know where shells come from? Can’t figure out what you found on the beach?  Bring it in and we will tell you all about seashells, how to collect them without harming the environment, and feature an assortment of live mollusks, crustaceans, and cool beach finds and artifacts. FREE!

Earth Day Dune Planting  
Thursday, April 22 from 4-6 p.m.  
(ages 4 and up, under 18 with adult)
Are you stuck wondering how you can help the environment for this year’s Earth Day? Get hands-on with our dune restoration project. By planting native grasses and other perennials, your actions will provide valuable habitat for local wildlife. Plants are in limited supply so this program will be first come, first served.  FREE!   

DROP-IN LOCAL NATURE SERIES

Join us for a series of eye-opening talks by Park System Naturalists to discover what’s lurking in the coastal waters of Monmouth County. The presentations are designed to inform the public of current issues, ecology and science research, and to inspire appreciation for the local natural world. FREE! 

 
American Oystercatchers of the Jersey Shore
   
Thursday, April 15 from 7-8 p.m.   
Bayshore Waterfront Park Visitor Center, Port Monmouth
The American oystercatcher is a large, stocky colorful shorebird that is common along the Jersey Shore. But there is more to this bird just eating oysters. The American Oystercatcher is listed as a species of special conservation concern in New Jersey. The population is in decline. Find out why and discover its diet, nesting activities and where it goes for the winter. Find out ways to help before the bird fades away.

Horseshoe Crabs Trying to Survive in a Modern World   
Thursday, May 20 from 7-8 p.m.  
Bayshore Waterfront Park Activity Center, Port Monmouth  
Horseshoe crabs are vital to the ecology of local tidal waters in Monmouth County. Every year, during the full and new moons of late May and early June, many horseshoe crabs crawl up onto beaches to spawn and create the next generation, as they have for at least 350 million years. But today there are many threats to the survival of these ancient seafarers. Join us as we discover why the population of horseshoe crabs is declining and what people are doing to protect the crab through research, and what you can do to help. It will be a fascinating learning experience.  

In accordance with New Jersey’s recently amended Smoke Free Air Act, all Monmouth County parks are now tobacco free. The new ban applies to cigarettes, pipes, cigars, e-cigarettes, and vaporize cigarettes, as well as smokeless tobacco such as snuff and chew.

Flood Control Project      

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is undertaking a multi-phased flood control project in Port Monmouth. The project involves the construction of about 7,070 feet of levees, 3,585 feet of floodwalls, 2,640 feet of dune, and beach renourishment at 10-year intervals along the Raritan Bay and Sandy Hook Bay in Port Monmouth. The project provides protection to low-lying residential and commercial structures, built upon and near salt and freshwater marshes that are experiencing flooding caused by coastal storm inundation. This problem has progressively worsened in recent years due to loss of protective beaches and increased urbanization in the area with structures susceptible to flooding from rainfall and coastal storm surges, erosion and wave attack, combined with restrictions to channel flow in the tidal creeks. This area was devastated by Superstorm Sandy.  The Preconstruction, Engineering and Design (PED) Phase was initiated in May 2002. A Hurricane Sandy Limited Reevaluation Report(HSLRR) approved December 2013. The first set of Plans and Specifications (P&S) have been completed and a Project Partnership Agreement (PPA) between the US Army Corps of Engineers and NJ Department of Environmental Protection was executed in January 2014. The dune, groin, pier extension and beach fill coastal features of the project have been completed. The remaining project components include Wetland mitigation, Pump Stations, Road Raising, Closure Gates, Levees, and Floodwalls. For more information please contact David Gentile, Project Manager U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, Phone: (917) 790-8483, david.gentile@usace.army.mil

 

 

 

Directions
  • Hwy. 36 in Middletown to Main St., Port Monmouth. Follow Main St. to Wilson Ave., turn left and continue to end. Turn left onto Port Monmouth Rd. Follow Port Monmouth Rd. to Park at end. 
  • Garden State Parkway to exit 117, follow Hwy. 36 south (see above).